Tag Archives: Becky Chambers

Weekend Reading List: New year, new list, new hope

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Weekend Reading List: Mini Superheroes and Alaskan Mythology

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  • Want some racebent Disney princesses? Well here you go. [Let There Be Doodles]
  • I’m clearly not done talking about the Star Wars expanded universe (RIP), and io9 rounds up the ten best and twelve worst stories from the sprawling world.
  • io9 also spells out, in no uncertain terms, why we care so much about what women superheroes are wearing.
  • Speaking of women superheroes, the BetterSupes Tumblr illustrates little girls’ superhero costumes, and the results are infinitely more creative than what big cartoon/comic book creators come up with.
  • Becky Chambers combines a game review (Child of Light, specifically) with a letter to her younger self, and the result is truly touching. [The Mary Sue]
  • Over at Quirk Books I wrote about science fiction poetry. Because that is just how I roll.
  • The Mary Sue has a two part piece on the queer history of comics, and it’s worth a look.
  • Hey remember Equinox, the first Cree DC Comics superhero? Here’s an interview with creator Jeff Lemire. [Maisonneuve]
  • I’ll be the first to admit that I’m a huge sucker for trailers. I’m embarrassingly easy to manipulate when it comes to these bite-sized sneak peeks, but even so, Kisima Inñitchuña (Never Alone) stands apart. The beautifully-illustrated puzzle adventure game shares Iñupiat stories and, no joke, I started tearing up. I’m that excited to play this folklore-inspired game. (Especially since you get an arctic fox as a sidekick. I love sidekicks.)
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Weekend Reading List: Genderbent captains and gaming couples

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Weekend Reading List: Witches and women in tech

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  • Happy belated Ada Lovelace Day! Over at Maisonneuve, my friend Shannon Palus reflects on the first programmer in her life, her mother.
  • Women in Tech has been a bit of a hot button issue these past few weeks (and, well, months really) and an aspect of the debate that I find completely fascinating is how women already working in tech, particularly powerfully-placed women, respond to criticisms of their industry. “‘Fuck You, I Got Mine’: Women in Tech for the Patriarchy” is a really good, almost manifesto-like starting off point to understanding how women apologists are complicit in the rampant discrimination of the tech industry. [Medium]
  • Along the same lines, Amanda Marcotte creates a template for every woman-penned defence of misogyny ever written, based on that terrible, terrible Sarah Lacy article, and it is flawless. [Slate]
  • Medium also has a list of things to say to people who really liked that terrible, terrible Sarah Lacy article.
  • I’m pretty much guaranteed to love anything Becky Chambers writes, and her piece on Tor, about astronauts and science/science fiction symbiosis, is no exception.
  • Scientific American blogger Dr. Danielle Lee was treated in an incredibly unprofessional way, blogged about it, then had her response taken down without warning and without a clear reason. Here’s a breakdown of the whole situation. #standingwithdnlee [Jezebel]
  • Around this time last year, I wrote an article about creepshots and screen caps and their role in internet misogyny (it’s unfortunately not online, but you can read an excerpt if you’re interested). After weeks of research, I thought I’d seen the worst of it, but Jezebel’s outline of the Chan girl phenomenon, and its long-lasting effects on one girl who participated, has rekindled all the sadness that I remember feeling.
  • io9 explores the worst mystical pregnancies in science fiction and fantasy, and once you see all these examples listed one after another, you start realizing how pervasive and ridiculous the trope is. Don’t know what the mystical pregnancy is? No worries, there’s a Feminist Frequency video at the end that explains it all.
  • New York Comic Con had a Women of Marvel panel, and it sounds like the Q&A was pretty great. [Bleeding Cool]
  • Star Trek might be coming back to television! MAKE IT SO! And the BBC is making a miniseries based on Susanna Clarke’s Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell! All the exciting TV news! [The Mary Sue]
  • Would you like a totally queer, incredibly in-depth love horoscope? Of course you would. [Autostraddle]
  • Halloween is just around the bend, and what better way to get excited than by reading all about historical women who were accused of being witches (or did similarly badass things)? History Witch is on it.
  • Oh, and if you want more Bee and PuppyCat episodes, there’s a Kickstarter for that.
  • What if there’s a good reason those horrible Wartune ads say “male gamers only”? [The Toast]

Top image from Kate Beaton’s amazing Hark! A Vagrant.

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Weekend Reading List: STEM fields and self-promotion

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  • First up is a piece that Becky Chambers wrote over at the Mary Sue about escapism, particularly in the form of video games, as a form of self-care. It’s something that’s very close to my heart, and a terrific read.
  • The Babysitter’s Club was a major part of my childhood (and together with Animorphs and Animal Ark completes the trifecta of kids’ series with a gazillion books that somehow were always present in your school library), and the Frisky has a roundup of the seven most scandalous moments in the series (spoiler: they’re not that scandalous).
  • On the subject of young adult literature, Buzzfeed has a list of great fashions from all your childhood books (if you were a late-nineties bookworm, that is). I still dress like Harriet the Spy, surprising no one.
  • Autostraddle has a great series on queer issues in STEM fields, and this instalment, about neurobiologist Ben Barres and his fight against sexism and heterosexism in academia, is a really great place to start.
  • Also about STEM fields, the New York Times has a really excellent, in depth article about the issues still plaguing women in physics. I cannot recommend it enough.
  • My Father’s Long, Long Legs is a Twine (text-based) game by Michael Lutz. It’s creepy and well-written, and doesn’t take long to play through. I’m a huge fan of the creativity that can stem from such basic game mechanics, and I don’t think it will be long before more Twine games get some mainstream play.
  • A trans* journalist was humiliated at Eurogamer Expo by a presenter hired for the event. Kotaku ran a story about it, but then she got a whole lot more hate. Can we please be better as a community?
  • Here’s a kitten brought back to life by a firefighter. [Most Watched Today]
  • And texts from a cat. [Sad and Useless]
  • How Many Earths? is a really cool interactive site that shows you how many potentially habitable, Earth-like planets there may be, based on the data gathered by the Kepler space telescope. [New Scientist]
  • These are genderbent couples from Sleeping Beauty, The Little Mermaid, and Aladdin, and they are glorious. [The Art of Doro]
  • “Confessions of a Snow Queen” is a beautiful piece (prefaced by a powerful poem) about the fetishization of white bodies in queer spaces, and the need to examine the white privilege present in dating. It’s a really thoughtful exploration of racial fetishes, and something everyone should think about. [Queer Libido]
  • And finally, I had a lot of fun at Montreal Comic Con, but I also wrote about the local artists and how they fit in (or don’t) to this huge, increasingly mainstream event. It’s over at Maisonneuve‘s website if that’s the sort of thing you’re interested in.
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